Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

College Kids: Is it Homesickness or Depression?

College Kids: Is it Homesickness or Depression?

The day your first child goes off to college is an emotional one for any parent.

What we might overlook, after the boxes are packed into the car or the dorm room is fully furnished, is that this is a massive shift for our children, too.

There is always excitement and anticipation, as they’re embarking on an entirely new journey, but that upheaval and change has its downsides as well. If you have a newly-minted college student and you’re noticing a few signs of sadness, homesickness, stress, or emotional shifts, you’re not alone.

Emotional Imbalance in College Kids

Emotional changes in college is such a big phenomenon that the Mayo Clinic has actually named the phenomenon “College Depression.”

According to them, College Depression is more about the overwhelm that comes with semi-adult life, and it causes a deep-seated shift in how a college kid functions.

Emotional changes in college is such a big phenomenon that the Mayo Clinic has actually named the phenomenon “College Depression.” According to them, College Depression is more about the overwhelm that comes with semi-adult life, and it causes a deep-seated shift in how a college kid functions.

In the past 15 years, depression has been diagnosed 100% more than it was in the early 2000s, and suicide rates have nearly tripled.

The average rate for the onset of “mental health concerns” is 18 to 24, right around the time most children encounter their first taste of adult life in college.

Most specialists believe this is because this is the first phase of adult life, and the body and mind take a while to adjust.

In college, your son or daughter has to:

  • Learn to follow his or her own schedule, and be responsible for grades, homework, and daily routine
  • Live away from home
  • Accommodate new cultures, new overwhelming energy
  • Deal with changing social dynamics in friendships, romantic interests, etc.

All of these things can lead to stress and overwhelm, which naturally causes our minds to trigger feelings of sadness, stress, and even homesickness.

College Kid is Struggling

How to Know if Your College Kid is Struggling

Mayo Clinic identifies “college depression” as:

  • Feelings of sadness, tearfulness, emptiness or hopelessness
  • Angry outbursts, irritability
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in their favorite activities
  • Insomnia (or sleeping too much)
  • Lethargy
  • Weight loss or weight gain (the Freshman 15 is still a thing)
  • Anxious reactions to normal situations
  • Risky behavior, i.e. partying, promiscuity, drugs, etc.
  • Dramatically decreasing grades, attendance, or campus involvement

If you are noticing these shifts in your child’s personality, don’t panic. Every big change in life can result in some temporary emotional changes.

The resilient mind will bounce back in a little while all on its own or, if you want to see fast results, with using flower remedies, plant medicine – totally safe, for your kids, college or elementary school!

In the video on my Facebook page Strongestminds, we are discussing emotional and natural, powerful therapeutic ways using plant medicine to build the confidence they need to thrive while also coping with new challenges they’re bound to face – the fears, the homesickness, the elevated anxiousness and social anxiety.

You will learn how:

  • Daisy, Rescue and Wild Pansy can calm the inner turmoil of anxiety.
  • How adding Kangaroo Paw and Dog Rose of the Wild will help with social anxiety and the energy of others all around you.
  • Why to keep Five Corners for confidence and Scottish Primrose around for confidence and fears and more.

You will learn how to take them, what other remedies will help the specific needs of your children, how easy to take and where to get them.

Very easy to use, and the benefits will astound you!

You May Also Like

Leave a Reply

X

Forgot Password?

Join Us

Password Reset
Please enter your e-mail address. You will receive a new password via e-mail.